Because He Has No Plan For Health Care Reform

Whether you are in favor of the Affordable Care Act, completely against it, think that it needs to be improved, or do not really care at all – Health Care is one of the leading issues facing our nation today. It is so prevalent, in fact, that many years from now Americans may consider health care and the Affordable Care Act as President Obama’s most significant legacy (and for the record, I won’t be the one to decide if that is a positive or a negative one).
 

Many conservative Americans are passionate about changing or completely repealing the Affordable Care Act, more commonly referred to as Obamacare. Where, might you ask, does their leading Presidential Candidate stand on this issue? Well he wants to repeal it, of course! And what, might you ask, is his plan to replace the largest piece of health-care-related legislation since the introduction of Medicare and Medicaid in 1965?
 
He has none, actually. This guy has no plan to improve, fix, or replace health care.
 
Seriously check it out. On his website, under the Issues tab, Mr. Trump has put together many cute videos about what he will do to fix various issues. I would argue that some of the issues such as political correctness, are not a real issues and don’t warrant 30 seconds of video , but that’s just my opinion.
 
I would also argue that health care is a pretty big deal and would warrant a video, but there is none. He consistently avoids the issue because he does not actually have an answer.
 

His Thoughts On Health Care Are Just Gibberish

Trump does say that he wants to repeal Obamacare but offers no context as to how he would improve it or what he would replace it with. During a primary debate on 2/25/2016 in Houston, Marco Rubio pressed this topic, to which Trump offered little more than just replacing it with something “much better.”
 
When asked to elaborate on his stance on the individual mandate requiring that all Americans obtain health insurance, he said, “I want to keep pre-existing conditions. I think we need it. I think it’s a modern age. And I think we have to have it.”
 
In response to this, Eric Black of MinnPost.com writes:
 

“This is gibberish, especially the explanation that ‘I think it’s a modern age,’ which may have some meaning but I can’t imagine what. But, in full context, it’s at least clear that the much better plan that he would propose to replace Obamacare would include the Obamacare feature that requires an insurer to cover any pre-existing conditions that the insured might have, and can’t charge them extra for it.

The one real suggestion that Trump has to improve Obamacare is to break down state lines in an effort to increase competition among insurance companies. But this is certainly not an original idea… many Republicans have been promoting this since 2010, and it was included in Mitt Romney’s plan to replace Obamacare when he ran in 2012.
 
That’s right. Mitt Romney had a plan. Trump, however, is just recycling an idea that most Republicans seem to agree on in an effort to gain support. The truth is that creating a national market for health insurance could absolutely be a good idea in the long run. But it would take time to perfect, and it also could also be a macroeconomic disaster.
 
So no… If you are trying to be elected as President of the United States and you’re claiming that the current health care system stinks, I hope you have more than one idea that might only be able to work in the long run.
 
After his gibberish comment during the debate, both Rubio and the moderator pressed Trump to give more insight to his health care plan. After awkwardly repeating himself several times, he commented that Rubio has a sweating problem, and then pretended that a he had a friend in the audience that worked for an insurance company and was waving to him.
 
The moderator continued to press the issue, and so Trump finally closed the subject by saying, “We’re going to have many different plans because… competition…”
 
Oh… Cool.
 

A Seven Point, Hypocritical Press Release

This debate was clearly a disaster, and within a week Trump released his seven point health care reform plan. It’s on his website under a Positions tab, not under the Issues tab that was mentioned earlier (The layout of his website makes about as much sense as many of his positions…or issues. Whatever).
 
This plan was released less than a week after the Houston debate, and it somehow managed to contradict one of the only questions that Trump answered on the topic:
 

MODERATOR: Mr. Trump, Senator Rubio just said that you support the individual mandate. Would you respond?
 
TRUMP: I just want to say, I agree with that 100 percent, except pre-existing conditions, I would absolutely get rid of Obamacare. We’re going to have something much better, but pre-existing conditions… I want to keep pre-existing conditions.

 
To explain his support for the individual mandate, Trump has often used the analogy that a Trump-Presidency would not let people die in the streets.
 
And yet, the first bullet point of his health care reform plan calls for eliminating the individual mandate:
 

  1. Completely repeal Obamacare. Our elected representatives must eliminate the individual mandate. No person should be required to buy insurance unless he or she wants to.

 
Bullet point two outlines the regurgitated plan to break down state lines to drive up competition. Points 3 – 7 are vague talking points that cover extremely complicated topics, but make for great sound bites during an election season:
 

“We will need to install programs that grow the economy and bring capital and jobs back to America

“We must also take actions in other policy areas to lower healthcare costs and burdens”

“The best social program has always been a job”

“We need to reform our mental health programs and institutions in this country”

 
These statements are about as vague as Make America Great Again. This is not a plan… This is a seven point press release to put out the dumpster fire that erupted when Trump was finally caught with his pants at his ankles during a debate.

 

 

Sources:

Donald Trump’s Official Website

The MinnPost, 2/26/2016

Forbes, 5/11/2012

The Daily Caller, 2/06/2016
 

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